(5) Benjamin Britten Academy of Music and Mathematics On Thursday 29th September, 21 students, accompanied by 2 members of staff, attended a trip arranged by the English department to watch a performance of the classic novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Originally published in 1813, the story follows young Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with manners, family expectations, wealth, and the rich and proud Mr. Darcy. Simon Reade’s adaptation, and producer Deborah Bruce’s inventive..." /> (5) Benjamin Britten Academy of Music and Mathematics On Thursday 29th September, 21 students, accompanied by 2 members of staff, attended a trip arranged by the English department to watch a performance of the classic novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Originally published in 1813, the story follows young Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with manners, family expectations, wealth, and the rich and proud Mr. Darcy. Simon Reade’s adaptation, and producer Deborah Bruce’s inventive..." id="meta_og_description"/>

Benjamin Britten Academy of Music & Mathematics

An 11-18 co-educational day school and Centre of Excellence in Mathematics

GCSE: 60% 9 to 4

English Department Trip: Pride and Prejudice at the Theatre Royal.

(5) Benjamin Britten Academy of Music and Mathematics

On Thursday 29th September, 21 students, accompanied by 2 members of staff, attended a trip arranged by the English department to watch a performance of the classic novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Originally published in 1813, the story follows young Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with manners, family expectations, wealth, and the rich and proud Mr. Darcy. Simon Reade’s adaptation, and producer Deborah Bruce’s inventive set design, created a lively and amusing performance which saw Austen’s characters brought to life and made bright and cheery through a perfectly poised script that blended hapless romance, social expectations and true love over an all-too-brief period of two and a half hours. A very positive reception from the audience and our scholars indicated it was time very well-spent, with many so engrossed by the performance that they wished it were longer. Our thanks are extended to Mrs. Sweetman (English), who worked tirelessly to arrange this exciting and enriching experience, and to our scholars whose behaviour was once again impeccable.